Soap Alum Vivica A. Fox Talks Aging, Sex Appeal And Plastic Surgery In Upscale

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One of my favorite former soap stars Vivica A. Fox addresses speculation about her plastic surgeries, aging in Hollywood and much more in the current issue of Upscale on newstands now.  I have always loved how Fox  speaks fondly of her time on soaps unlike so many of her Hollyweird peers.

For those of you who aren't familiar with Ms. Fox's soapy past, she played Maya on the short-lived Sally Sussman Morina NBC soap Generations. Generations was the first soap to premiere with a black family-The Marshalls- at the core of the show.

Fox's character was paired opposite Kristoff St. John's Adam Marshall, heir to the Marshall ice cream chain fortune. Adam's big sister Chantal was played by All My Children's Debbie Morgan, who left the signature role of Dr. Angie Hubbard to take a risk on the groundbreaking soap. As did James Reynolds, who vacated the popular role of Abe Carver on Days of Our Lives for a time to portray Marshall family patriarch Henry Marshall.

While Generations only lasted two short years (It didn't stand a chance against ratings powerhouse Young and the Restless which has always been extremely popular among African-American audiences), the show still made history and launched the careers of St. John-who was quickly snatched up by Y&R as budding Newman exec Neil Winters-and Kelly Rutherford (ex-Sam) who went on to a lead role on the Fox hit Melrose Place and now stars on The CW's Gossip Girl.

As for Fox, she  went on to sitcom acclaim, guest starring on The Fresh Prince of Belair and starring in the Patti LaBelle sitcom Out All Night, before joining the cast of Young and the Restless herself as a love interest for Shemar Moore's Malcolm in 1995. Not that her character Stephanie had much time to steam up the screen with Malcolm. Shortly after joining Y&R in the recurring role, she won a part in a little film called Indepence Day opposite her Fresh Prince leading man Will Smith. The rest is post-soap history.