13 Soap Opera Sobbers Who Have Perfected The Oprah Ugly Cry


No. 13: Kelly Monaco, General Hospital


It's a good thing Frank Valentini is excellent at managing General Hospital's budget, otherwise ABC's last remaining soap might have gone broke from buying Kleenex for the character of Sam McCall (Kelly Monaco)! Sam hasn't had many opportunities to turn on the water works lately. She's too busy being happy with Dr. Silas Clay (Michael Easton), but if and when she learns Robin (Kimberly McCullough) is off trying to save Jason, Port Charles, New York will once again be under a flood warning.

 — Regan Cellura

Oprah to Lindsay Lohan: “You Need to Cut the Bull Sh*t” (VIDEO)




OWN's highly-anticipated documentary series following troubled actress Lindsay Lohan debuts Sunday night, and the channel has released a first look video. The camera's follow Lohan as she tries to get her life back on track, but it appears everyone involved is in for a bumpy ride.

In the preview, Oprah Winfrey admits Lohan was behaving just like she'd been warned she would. The teaser features the Mighty O telling Lohan, "You need to cut the bull shit." Watch it after the jump!


Oprah: Where Are They Now to Feature Dallas’ Linda Gray and Patrick Duffy



Oprah is donning her 10-gallon hat to interview Dallas icons Linda Gray (Sue Ellen) and Patrick Duffy (Bobby Ewing) on Sunday's installment of Oprah: Where Are They Now at 10 pm EST on OWN. In addition to chatting with the Dallas stars, the episode will feature Winfrey catching up with Melissa Joan Hart, Joey Lawrence and Marcia Clark.

Oprah on OWN’s Early Content: “Too Stoic and Too Serious”



The first year of Oprah Winfrey's cable network was a challenge for the talk show queen. OWN struggled in the ratings and several series flopped. In an interview with Vulture,  Winfrey credits execs Sheri Salta, Erik Logan, the channel's partnership with Tyler Perry and other programming changes with OWN's turnaround. She also copped to the cabler being too serious early on. Here's an excerpt:


You also had to make a big shift in the kinds of programs you put on OWN.

I have a tendency to look at everything from the point of view of: What is going to be meaningful, and uplift people? That can become too stoic and too serious—which is the same issue I suffered with at the magazine in the beginning. It needed more humor. So we [began] looking for lighter fare. Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s works. Iyanla: Fix My Life was also a turning point. Having programming that was in alignment with the vision but also left the space to widen the lane for the vision. If it were up to me, I’d be doing [Winfrey’s Sunday talk show] Super Soul Sunday conversations all the time.